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Networking in English

Have you ever done any networking in English?

Networking is an important skill that you can use to get a new job, connect with other professionals or increase business.

But how can you network in English?

In this English video class, we’ll show you how to network in 5 easy steps.

After watching the video, try our little quiz below to see how much you can remember.

Happy learning!

Level: Pre-Intermediate to Upper Intermediate (A2-B2)

Video: YES!

Vocabulary

Here are some useful words that appear in the video.

A step

A “step” is one action in a series of actions that you take so you can do or complete something.

To reach out to someone

If you “reach out to someone”, you try to make contact with that person, often so you can ask for help, or so you can offer them support, ideas or assistance.

An elevator pitch

An “elevator pitch” is a short presentation you give about yourself or your company. An elevator pitch is supposed to last about the same time as an elevator ride – around 30 seconds.

A goal

A “goal” is an objective – something you’re trying to do or achieve.

To get the full picture

If you “get the full picture”, you understand everything about a situation and have a full description of it, including all the details.

A lasting connection

If you make a “lasting connection” with someone, you create a long, deep relationship with that person.

To listen actively

When you “listen actively”, you focus on the person who is talking and listen very carefully to what they’re saying, often asking questions, or using short words or making sounds (ah-huh, really?) to show you’re interested.

To nod your head

When you “nod your head”, you move it up and down as a way of saying yes.

A business card

A “business card” is a small card that has information about you, as well as contact details such as your phone number or e-mail or website address.

A follow-up message

A “follow-up message” is a message you send someone by email, text, etc. after meeting them. It’s a way of reminding them about the meeting.

Video quiz 

You’re going to watch a video with someone talking about networking and how to do it in English. Watch it once and answer the questions below. [answers below]

  1. In Step 1, what two things does the speaker suggest you could say as a way of introducing yourself?
  2. In Step 2, according to the speaker, how long do you have to tell the other person about yourself?
  3. In Step 3, what non-verbal communication does the speaker suggest using to show that you’re listening?
  4. In Step 4, what contact details does the speaker suggest you should get from the person you spoke to?
  5. In Step 5, what does the speaker suggest sending to the person you were networking with?

Video script

Hello, my name is Savannah and today we are going to be talking about how to network in English. Networking is an important skill to use in the workplace in order to expand your connections, but networking can also be something that is very intimidating. So, in this video we will be breaking the process of networking into 5 easy steps. Practice this different processes and steps with those around you because practice makes perfect. You can apply these different processes to every situation, adapted for the person you are with and what your ultimate goal of the conversation is.
Step 1 – The introduction
The first step is the introduction. So, maybe you are at a conference or a meeting and you see someone new. This is a really great opportunity to reach out to the person and say something really simple. Maybe like something you liked about the conference or even something as simple as how the weather is today. For example, you could say, “It’s such a beautiful day today!”
Or something else like, “Wow, I really loved this topic in the conference.”
Step 2 – The elevator Pitch
After you are having a conversation with someone, it is important to take the opportunity to ask who they are and what they do. You should also introduce yourself. And here, you can think of it as an elevator pitch. You have 30 seconds to tell the other person about who you are, what you do, and just about yourself! Make sure to keep it short and sweet, and only say the most important things about yourself. So, your pitch should include things like:
  • Where are you from?
  • What kind of work do you do?
  • Where do you work?
  • What are your future goals?
For example, you could say something like:
My name is Savannah and I work for a technology department called Tech Industries in Madrid. I am currently working on advanced computer website design for several different small businesses in Madrid. I’m really working to expand my company network to reach larger companies with more advanced software needs.
So, here you had your name, where you work, what kind of work you do, and your future goals. So, when putting this all together it is important to have all of these different parts so someone can get the full picture about you.           
Step 3 – Make a connection
Throughout the conversation it’s important to make connections to the other person. What work do they do and you do that you have in common? These connections will help this relationship last beyond this simple moment! So, in order to make a lasting connection you must be actively listening to what they are saying, so you should use non-verbal and verbal communication to show you are invested in the conversation. So, this could be asking questions, nodding your head, and keeping eye contact with the person. So, for example to make a lasting connection you could say something like:
“Wow that’s so interesting. I’m very interested in coding, could you tell me a little more about the current project you are working on?”
This shows interest in the work that they’re doing, and also shows that you are interested in their work. So, this is something that could be continued in the future.
Step 4 – Get their information
The 4th step is to get their information. This can be how you can reach out to them in the future. This could be anything from their email, to their phone number, maybe their LinkedIn, a business card or anything of that sort. It also may be a good idea to have business cards yourself so that they also have all of your information in one place and they can reach out to you as well in the future. So, for example you could say something like:
“It has been great speaking with you. Could I get your business card or email so we can touch base in the future about your coding project?”
This is a good example because it shows interest in communicating more in the future and about something specific. So, if you do this it will help further in step #5.
Step 5 – Send a follow-up
The 5th and final step of networking is to send a follow-up. After a day or two of networking with the person, it’s a really good idea to send a follow-up email or text. This email should include your name, the context in which you met, and any connections you might have made with that other person. So, for example an email could look something like this:
Hello Jenny,
This is Savannah from the IT department in Tech industries. It was great speaking with you yesterday at the IT conference. I’m really interested in your work with computer programming and would be very interested to speak with you further about it. I look forward to hearing from you!
Best,
Savannah

 These five steps can be a great way to format your networking plan, but it’s important to remember that every situation will different, and you need to personalize these 5 steps to make this process what you really want it to be. So, the way that you approach the conversation and the topics you speak about may be different in every conversation. But practice makes perfect! So, remember to practice these steps whenever you can and good luck in your networking.

Answers

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Video quiz

  1. In Step 1, what two things does the speaker suggest you could say as a way of introducing yourself? She suggests saying, “It’s such a beautiful day today!”, or, “Wow, I really loved this topic in the conference.”
  2. In Step 2, according to the speaker, how long do you have to tell the other person about yourself? 30 seconds.
  3. In Step 3, what non-verbal communication does the speaker suggest using to show that you’re listening? Nodding your head and keeping eye contact.
  4. In Step 4, what contact details does the speaker suggest you should get from the person you spoke to? Their email, their phone number, their LinkedIn address or a business card.
  5. In Step 5, what does the speaker suggest sending to the person you were networking with? An email or text.

 

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